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In 2018, 115 foreign companies opened an office or expanded their business in West Holland with the assistance of regional acquisition partners. These firms are expected to provide in excess of 2,600 jobs and to invest a total of 278 million euros in the region. Since 2014, The Hague Business Agency, Rotterdam Partners and InnovationQuarter have been actively collaborating to place the region in the global spotlight and to attract and support foreign companies. This has paid off: 26% of international companies that set up business in the Netherlands last year chose West Holland.

United States and China strongly represented

Most of the foreign companies that made a new or an expansion investment in West Holland in 2018 came from China (23) and the USA (22). This is in line with the trend of recent years with the majority of firms hailing from these two countries.

Chinese companies that established themselves in West Holland during 2018 include Genscript (biomedical firm with European branch in Leiden), Oppo (smartphones in Rotterdam) and Newtrend Group (biochemicals in The Hague).

Major names from the US that set up in or expanded into West Holland include GE Healthcare (new office in Rotterdam), Microsoft (Quantum Lab in Delft) and Synergy International Systems (Tech for Good in The Hague).

The figures for 2018 also reveal that companies from ‘new’ countries are coming to the region. For example, the strong growth in the number of firms from India and Turkey is striking. Eight companies from each country chose West Holland as their base in the Netherlands.

New sectors: ‘Next’ and ‘Impact’ Economy

Also noteworthy is the growing presence of firms active in the Next Economy. This includes a significant number of young tech companies that have made West Holland their home due to the region’s strong innovation ecosystem.

No fewer than 34 of the 115 newly established foreign firms in 2018 operate in the high-tech and IT sectors, followed by 14 in life sciences and health, 13 in the energy sector and 11 in agro and food.

We also see many new businesses (12) active in the so-called ‘Impact Economy’; companies that are working on making the world a better, safer and fairer place.

Investor Relations Programme: 298 companies visited

In addition to attracting new companies, The Hague Business Agency, Rotterdam Partners and InnovationQuarter also actively support foreign firms already established in the region.

This is part of the national Investor Relations Programme, which is co-funded by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy, the Rotterdam-The Hague Metropolitan Region and the Province of South Holland. In 2018, the three acquisition partners visited a total of 298 companies through the programme.

Successful collaboration on acquisition in West Holland

Attracting and retaining foreign investment is of great importance to the Netherlands and the West Holland region, not least in terms of economic growth and job creation. The 115 international companies succesfully assisted in 2018, for example, will by their own estimate create 2,108 new jobs within three years and secure 535 existing jobs. In addition, these firms are jointly investing 278 million euros in the region.

The 115 investment projects are the result of a joint effort by the regional agencies Rotterdam Partners, The Hague Business Agency and InnovationQuarter in association with the Netherlands Foreign Investment Agency (NFIA), an operational unit of the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy. The acquisition partners have been collaborating closely since 2014, both strategically and operationally, and have achieved great success. In 2018, 26% of all foreign companies* that established themselves in the Netherlands opted for West Holland, well above the region’s share in the national economy. In 2014, it was 20%.

 

* This concerns the projects completed by Rotterdam Partners, The Hague Business Agency and InnovationQuarter in collaboration with the NFIA (Netherlands Foreign Investment Agency).

Terug naar overzicht

Australian product innovation agency IDE Group recently opened its new European headquarters in CIC Rotterdam, from where it will serve its European partners. IDE Group has a solid track record in developing MedTech innovations in partnership with various associates such as Bayer and ResMed. Rotterdam’s central location in Europe and its access to top talent made it a logical, strategic choice for IDE. During the LSH010 breakfast in the Rotterdam Science Tower, IDE Group received a cornerstone to commemorate the opening of its office. The stone was presented on behalf of Alderman of Economic development, Barbara Kathmann as well as collaborating partners InnovationQuarter, Rotterdam Partners, NFIA and Life Sciences & Health 010, all of which supported IDE Group in setting up the new headquarters.

Nederland, Rotterdam, 28/03/2019
LSH010 Ontbijt in de Science Tower.
foto Jan de Groen

Enabler and accelerator of MedTech innovations

IDE Group was founded in Sydney (Australia) in 2003 by Richard Sokolov and George Sidis. The agency partners with larger MedTech companies to accelerate product innovation and currently has 50 employees.

While major medical device companies are not lacking in good ideas or funding, they are often incapable of changing gears quickly and unable to develop solutions that fall outside of their current systems and procedures. IDE therefore works with these parties to complete product development successfully and within agreed time frames.

Incubator for new innovations

IDE assists startups and facilitates the transfer of knowledge and technology from universities and hospitals. The agency provides a team of experienced designers and entrepreneurs who help develop products and then build companies around them. This is also how the new business Atomo Diagnostics, founded by John Kelly and IDE, came to be. The medical startup shook up the market for diagnostic testing with a new, user-friendly HIV test that makes accurate diagnostics available at extremely low cost. This attracted the attention of the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and an HIV self-test was subsequently developed in collaboration with both these organisations. IDE is a partner throughout the entire development process, which involves building a business and supplying a product.

Alderman of Economic development in Rotterdam, Barbara Kathmann: “Rotterdam is growing economically, and the digital services economy is playing an important role in this. The arrival of IDE in Rotterdam underlines the innovation climate of the city. Newly established, progressive entrepreneurship is good for the economy of the city and given the background of IDE, I assume that they will be a good link between Rotterdam’s talent, innovations and entrepreneurship.”

Close to high-quality talent

IDE works closely with technical universities in the Netherlands and has several Dutch staff on its Australian team. In addition, the company has direct contact with clinical experts and various professionals at Erasmus University Medical Center, which is a source of ideas for new application directions based on clinical practice. These collaborations make Rotterdam a logical destination for IDE’s European headquarters. The city’s central position and the excellent infrastructure, linking Rotterdam with the rest of Europe, also means it’s the ideal location from which to grow the agency’s European business.

Willem Mees van der Bijl, director of IDE Netherlands, says: “As a TU Delft graduate, I know the merit of the university’s technical education programmes as well as how much they are valued by companies around the world. Great new ideas come from Erasmus University Medical Center and YES!Delft is the place to find the right entrepreneurial people. I’m very excited about this collaboration!”

Terug naar overzicht

It was the pedometer that gave him away. Tennis coach Mark de J. was suspected of killing entrepreneur Koen Everink. De J. claimed that at the time of the murder he was being held in a back seat, but his pedometer told a different story. Just one example of digital evidence helping to solve a case. Hans Henseler and Carl Tinker of Magnet Forensics expect this type of information will in future be part of all police investigations. It is therefore high time that not only digital forensics specialists but also regular investigators had the opportunity to review digital evidence. Magnet’s intuitive assessment tool – Magnet REVIEW – makes this possible.

What makes Magnet Forensics so innovative?

“What makes Magnet REVIEW so good is that the tool works intuitively,” says Carl Tinker, sales director at Magnet Forensics. “For instance, anyone can order a football shirt on Amazon. You select the correct size and the right colour, team and fabric. Magnet REVIEW is equally user-friendly. In the left column, investigators can click on e-mail, chat, photos and documents. It lets them easily examine the digital evidence and assess its relevance to the case.”

Tinker adds, “When digital forensics first emerged, a group of experts sat in a corner and that’s where you would send the digital evidence. Nowadays, these experts still unlock the raw data, but the detectives are the ones that assess the evidence because they have knowledge of the suspects and the timeline of events.”

In 2018, the Canadian company Magnet Forensics acquired the product Tracks Inspector as well as the team of the Dutch firm that went by the same name. Tracks Inspector had, among other things, developed the well-known chatbot Sweetie for researchers at Terre des Hommes. With Magnet Forensics, Tracks Inspector has now become Magnet REVIEW.

How has InnovationQuarter contributed to the establishment of Magnet Forensics in The Hague?

“About 20 months ago when in Canada, we met Chris van Voorden, head of Foreign Investments at InnovationQuarter,” says Carl Tinker. “Chris told us about the soft landing programme that InnovationQuarter organises in conjunction with the Canadian embassy. This initiative is for Canadian companies that want to become acquainted with the West Holland ecosystem.”

Tinker explains that Magnetic Forensics was at the time still thinking of the United Kingdom as the location for its EMEA headquarters: “Although we had clients in the Netherlands, we did not have any strategic contact until Chris and account manager Philip introduced us to the Ministry of Justice, potential partners and The Hague Security Delta. We then started scratching our heads because access to the European market is much better from the Netherlands than from the UK. And Brexit was coming too.”

So, the company decided to settle in The Hague.

“InnovationQuarter made us feel that there really was a support structure for us here,” says Tinker. “We were introduced not only to strategic partners and government bodies but to various commercial leads as well. For example, it was at an event recommended to us by InnovationQuarter that we met our Romanian partner. We are now doing substantial business with them.”

What is the social impact of Magnet Forensics?

Magnet Forensics began life on the work floor. The Canadian police officer Jad Saliba, who himself has a background in IT, was disturbed by the fact that his colleagues worked so little with digital evidence. Digital specialists were overloaded and investigators had not mastered the complex digital forensics tools that were available.

Saliba therefore built a tool that allowed non-technical colleagues to analyse digital evidence. His company, Magnet Forensics, now employs 220 people. But in his heart, Saliba is still a law enforcement officer with a strong social mission: seeking justice and protecting the innocent.

What does the future look like?

“We want to grow,” replies Hans Henseler, co-founder of Tracks Inspector and now director of Magnet REVIEW at Magnet Forensics. “We hope to increase our turnover fivefold, but we are also growing in terms of staff: this year, we will go from five to nine FTEs. And if we add staff for support and training, we need to think along the lines of 12 employees in total.”

Henseler lectures on digital forensics at Leiden University of Applied Sciences one day a week. He says, “What Magnet does will only become more relevant over time as there are many things that people are quite poor at but which machines excel at. You cannot stop the current trend.”

Wat kunnen wij voor u betekenen?

Neem gerust contact met ons op.

Martijn van Hoogenhuijze

Senior Account Manager Safety & Security
Terug naar overzicht

In 2018, 115 foreign companies opened an office or expanded their business in West Holland with the assistance of regional acquisition partners. These firms are expected to provide in excess of 2,600 jobs and to invest a total of 278 million euros in the region. Since 2014, The Hague Business Agency, Rotterdam Partners and InnovationQuarter have been actively collaborating to place the region in the global spotlight and to attract and support foreign companies. This has paid off: 26% of international companies that set up business in the Netherlands last year chose West Holland.

United States and China strongly represented

Most of the foreign companies that made a new or an expansion investment in West Holland in 2018 came from China (23) and the USA (22). This is in line with the trend of recent years with the majority of firms hailing from these two countries.

Chinese companies that established themselves in West Holland during 2018 include Genscript (biomedical firm with European branch in Leiden), Oppo (smartphones in Rotterdam) and Newtrend Group (biochemicals in The Hague).

Major names from the US that set up in or expanded into West Holland include GE Healthcare (new office in Rotterdam), Microsoft (Quantum Lab in Delft) and Synergy International Systems (Tech for Good in The Hague).

The figures for 2018 also reveal that companies from ‘new’ countries are coming to the region. For example, the strong growth in the number of firms from India and Turkey is striking. Eight companies from each country chose West Holland as their base in the Netherlands.

New sectors: ‘Next’ and ‘Impact’ Economy

Also noteworthy is the growing presence of firms active in the Next Economy. This includes a significant number of young tech companies that have made West Holland their home due to the region’s strong innovation ecosystem.

No fewer than 34 of the 115 newly established foreign firms in 2018 operate in the high-tech and IT sectors, followed by 14 in life sciences and health, 13 in the energy sector and 11 in agro and food.

We also see many new businesses (12) active in the so-called ‘Impact Economy’; companies that are working on making the world a better, safer and fairer place.

Investor Relations Programme: 298 companies visited

In addition to attracting new companies, The Hague Business Agency, Rotterdam Partners and InnovationQuarter also actively support foreign firms already established in the region.

This is part of the national Investor Relations Programme, which is co-funded by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy, the Rotterdam-The Hague Metropolitan Region and the Province of South Holland. In 2018, the three acquisition partners visited a total of 298 companies through the programme.

Successful collaboration on acquisition in West Holland

Attracting and retaining foreign investment is of great importance to the Netherlands and the West Holland region, not least in terms of economic growth and job creation. The 115 international companies succesfully assisted in 2018, for example, will by their own estimate create 2,108 new jobs within three years and secure 535 existing jobs. In addition, these firms are jointly investing 278 million euros in the region.

The 115 investment projects are the result of a joint effort by the regional agencies Rotterdam Partners, The Hague Business Agency and InnovationQuarter in association with the Netherlands Foreign Investment Agency (NFIA), an operational unit of the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy. The acquisition partners have been collaborating closely since 2014, both strategically and operationally, and have achieved great success. In 2018, 26% of all foreign companies* that established themselves in the Netherlands opted for West Holland, well above the region’s share in the national economy. In 2014, it was 20%.

 

* This concerns the projects completed by Rotterdam Partners, The Hague Business Agency and InnovationQuarter in collaboration with the NFIA (Netherlands Foreign Investment Agency).

Terug naar overzicht

Australian product innovation agency IDE Group recently opened its new European headquarters in CIC Rotterdam, from where it will serve its European partners. IDE Group has a solid track record in developing MedTech innovations in partnership with various associates such as Bayer and ResMed. Rotterdam’s central location in Europe and its access to top talent made it a logical, strategic choice for IDE. During the LSH010 breakfast in the Rotterdam Science Tower, IDE Group received a cornerstone to commemorate the opening of its office. The stone was presented on behalf of Alderman of Economic development, Barbara Kathmann as well as collaborating partners InnovationQuarter, Rotterdam Partners, NFIA and Life Sciences & Health 010, all of which supported IDE Group in setting up the new headquarters.

Nederland, Rotterdam, 28/03/2019
LSH010 Ontbijt in de Science Tower.
foto Jan de Groen

Enabler and accelerator of MedTech innovations

IDE Group was founded in Sydney (Australia) in 2003 by Richard Sokolov and George Sidis. The agency partners with larger MedTech companies to accelerate product innovation and currently has 50 employees.

While major medical device companies are not lacking in good ideas or funding, they are often incapable of changing gears quickly and unable to develop solutions that fall outside of their current systems and procedures. IDE therefore works with these parties to complete product development successfully and within agreed time frames.

Incubator for new innovations

IDE assists startups and facilitates the transfer of knowledge and technology from universities and hospitals. The agency provides a team of experienced designers and entrepreneurs who help develop products and then build companies around them. This is also how the new business Atomo Diagnostics, founded by John Kelly and IDE, came to be. The medical startup shook up the market for diagnostic testing with a new, user-friendly HIV test that makes accurate diagnostics available at extremely low cost. This attracted the attention of the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and an HIV self-test was subsequently developed in collaboration with both these organisations. IDE is a partner throughout the entire development process, which involves building a business and supplying a product.

Alderman of Economic development in Rotterdam, Barbara Kathmann: “Rotterdam is growing economically, and the digital services economy is playing an important role in this. The arrival of IDE in Rotterdam underlines the innovation climate of the city. Newly established, progressive entrepreneurship is good for the economy of the city and given the background of IDE, I assume that they will be a good link between Rotterdam’s talent, innovations and entrepreneurship.”

Close to high-quality talent

IDE works closely with technical universities in the Netherlands and has several Dutch staff on its Australian team. In addition, the company has direct contact with clinical experts and various professionals at Erasmus University Medical Center, which is a source of ideas for new application directions based on clinical practice. These collaborations make Rotterdam a logical destination for IDE’s European headquarters. The city’s central position and the excellent infrastructure, linking Rotterdam with the rest of Europe, also means it’s the ideal location from which to grow the agency’s European business.

Willem Mees van der Bijl, director of IDE Netherlands, says: “As a TU Delft graduate, I know the merit of the university’s technical education programmes as well as how much they are valued by companies around the world. Great new ideas come from Erasmus University Medical Center and YES!Delft is the place to find the right entrepreneurial people. I’m very excited about this collaboration!”

Terug naar overzicht

It was the pedometer that gave him away. Tennis coach Mark de J. was suspected of killing entrepreneur Koen Everink. De J. claimed that at the time of the murder he was being held in a back seat, but his pedometer told a different story. Just one example of digital evidence helping to solve a case. Hans Henseler and Carl Tinker of Magnet Forensics expect this type of information will in future be part of all police investigations. It is therefore high time that not only digital forensics specialists but also regular investigators had the opportunity to review digital evidence. Magnet’s intuitive assessment tool – Magnet REVIEW – makes this possible.

What makes Magnet Forensics so innovative?

“What makes Magnet REVIEW so good is that the tool works intuitively,” says Carl Tinker, sales director at Magnet Forensics. “For instance, anyone can order a football shirt on Amazon. You select the correct size and the right colour, team and fabric. Magnet REVIEW is equally user-friendly. In the left column, investigators can click on e-mail, chat, photos and documents. It lets them easily examine the digital evidence and assess its relevance to the case.”

Tinker adds, “When digital forensics first emerged, a group of experts sat in a corner and that’s where you would send the digital evidence. Nowadays, these experts still unlock the raw data, but the detectives are the ones that assess the evidence because they have knowledge of the suspects and the timeline of events.”

In 2018, the Canadian company Magnet Forensics acquired the product Tracks Inspector as well as the team of the Dutch firm that went by the same name. Tracks Inspector had, among other things, developed the well-known chatbot Sweetie for researchers at Terre des Hommes. With Magnet Forensics, Tracks Inspector has now become Magnet REVIEW.

How has InnovationQuarter contributed to the establishment of Magnet Forensics in The Hague?

“About 20 months ago when in Canada, we met Chris van Voorden, head of Foreign Investments at InnovationQuarter,” says Carl Tinker. “Chris told us about the soft landing programme that InnovationQuarter organises in conjunction with the Canadian embassy. This initiative is for Canadian companies that want to become acquainted with the West Holland ecosystem.”

Tinker explains that Magnetic Forensics was at the time still thinking of the United Kingdom as the location for its EMEA headquarters: “Although we had clients in the Netherlands, we did not have any strategic contact until Chris and account manager Philip introduced us to the Ministry of Justice, potential partners and The Hague Security Delta. We then started scratching our heads because access to the European market is much better from the Netherlands than from the UK. And Brexit was coming too.”

So, the company decided to settle in The Hague.

“InnovationQuarter made us feel that there really was a support structure for us here,” says Tinker. “We were introduced not only to strategic partners and government bodies but to various commercial leads as well. For example, it was at an event recommended to us by InnovationQuarter that we met our Romanian partner. We are now doing substantial business with them.”

What is the social impact of Magnet Forensics?

Magnet Forensics began life on the work floor. The Canadian police officer Jad Saliba, who himself has a background in IT, was disturbed by the fact that his colleagues worked so little with digital evidence. Digital specialists were overloaded and investigators had not mastered the complex digital forensics tools that were available.

Saliba therefore built a tool that allowed non-technical colleagues to analyse digital evidence. His company, Magnet Forensics, now employs 220 people. But in his heart, Saliba is still a law enforcement officer with a strong social mission: seeking justice and protecting the innocent.

What does the future look like?

“We want to grow,” replies Hans Henseler, co-founder of Tracks Inspector and now director of Magnet REVIEW at Magnet Forensics. “We hope to increase our turnover fivefold, but we are also growing in terms of staff: this year, we will go from five to nine FTEs. And if we add staff for support and training, we need to think along the lines of 12 employees in total.”

Henseler lectures on digital forensics at Leiden University of Applied Sciences one day a week. He says, “What Magnet does will only become more relevant over time as there are many things that people are quite poor at but which machines excel at. You cannot stop the current trend.”

Wat kunnen wij voor u betekenen?

Neem gerust contact met ons op.

Martijn van Hoogenhuijze

Senior Account Manager Safety & Security
Terug naar overzicht

WestHolland launched as composites hotspot during JEC World in Paris

Dutch composites industry

The unique ecosystem for composites & new materials in West Holland was presented in the Holland Pavilion of industry association CompositesNL. Besides the academic knowledge & research, application development and original equipment manufacturers present in our region, special attention was given to SAM XL.

Fieldlab SAM XL

The Smart Advanced Manufacturing (SAM) XL fieldlab will open in 2019 and serves as a research and testing facility for automated composite technology solutions; like the automated manufacturing of thin-walled aerospace structures or thick-walled structures for wind turbine blades and bridge decks. Partners in this fieldlab, like TU Delft, GTM Advanced Structures, Fokker/GKN Aerospace and KVE Composites were also present at the fair. And with showcases from Inholland and Airborne Composites, the West Holland ecosystem was strongly represented.

Infographic

Here are 10 reasons Why West Holland is the hotspot for composites. Download the infographic via this link or request a hardcopy via communicatie@innovationquarter.nl.

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Carles Gómara Director of Innovation at the Catalan Agency for Business Competitiveness ACCIO, gave his perspective on ongoing digitalization, which is changing our society rapidly. He used the analogy of the rabbit and the turtoise, to emphasize that however fast technology is evolving, adaptation is always lagging behind. This is true for many technology trends, which we now call big data, artificial intelligence and internet of things, but have in fact been around for a very long time.

 

Using the examples of several “smart home” applications, such as a smart washing machine, Carles questioned the necessity of all this technology in our daily lives. A question that is not always asked at a side-event of a technology conference such as MWC. Without drawing conclusions Carles shared many real-life examples for the audience to consider, adding that like with many things in life “we need time”.

Security issues of IoT

Ernst Bovelander, CEO of Delft-based Brightsight discussed high assurance security evaluations, which is Brightsight’s core business. Many chips, which are used in for instance creditcards, cellphones and passports, have to comply with the highest security regulations, which Brighsight validates. Ernst stressed the importance of securing all household internet of things solutions. Even in the most basic examples such as connected doorbells, a lot of easily hackable technology is involved. Ernst gave a couple of additional examples, and the implications for the 50 billion connected devides that are expected to be operational around 2030. In general Ernst stressed that the security aspect of IoT should not be underestimated. Even as consumers, we should be aware of the risks of poorly secured devices that will be around us more and more.

Dialogue with consumers will be the user interface of the future – Jorge Marquez Moreno, Head of user experience design at Everis

Brightsight is the number one security evaluation lab in the world. It is fair to call Brightsight a global company, as 99% of their customers are based outside the Netherlands and their 170 employees come from 30 different countries. In addition to their head office in Delft, they recently set up an R&D office in Barcelona, where they are quickly expanding.

Jorge Marquez Moreno, Head of user experience design at Everis shared his “AI fears & cheers research” – which was conducted at Everis’ R&D lab in Barcelona. Jorge and his team interviewed end-users about how they experience technology. “We can learn best how to optimize AI-based consumer products by interviewing actual people. Dialogue with consumers will be the user interface of the future”, Jorge argued.

Everis found that consumers’ opinions on AI are heavily influenced by the media. Negative examples such as those of self-driving cars being involved in fatal accidents, or Cambridge Analytica abusing Facebook data to manipulate the democratic process, will stick more than the great services that e.g. Netflix and Spotify provides using AI. On the other hand, Everis found that consumers will cheer for AI when it makes life easier, and even more when it really improves the quality of, or even saves their life, but that the attitude changes when people fear that AI/machines will take over. This fear is especially emerging when AI is perceived to replace human interaction, emotional intelligence and judgement. For example, many people feel ‘tricked’ when they find out they have been talking to an AI- based chatbot in stead of a human. This demonstrates the importance of creating awareness about AI and making consumers understand how they can benefit from this technology.

On behalf of ACCIO and InnovationQuarter, we would like to thank all the amazing speakers and all our Dutch, Catalan and international visitors and partners. It was geat to see the networking taking place, further strengthening the ties between Catalunya and the Netherlands.

MWC Barcelona

At MWC, InnovationQuarter was part of the Holland Pavillion, which was hosted by Enterprise Summit. The Dutch have a great presence at MWC, which made this a great timing for the Dutch-Catalan meetup. We will be at MWC untill Thursday, so if you are looking for opportunities in (West) Holland, find us in in Hall 7.

Brightsight

Brightsight is a Delft- and Barcelona- based company, that offers security evaluations and certificates on behalf of major payment schemes and industry organisations worldwide to ensure the right level of security. These services are provided to IC manufacturers, (embedded) secure device manufacturers, card suppliers and service providers.

Brightsight is a knowledge-based company. Our international team of experts stay up to date with the latest technologies and requirements to ensure the most reliable and efficient evaluation process possible for our customers.

Everis

Everis is a large family with 21,000 professionals across Europe, USA and Latin America. The company has recently set up a Dutch office.

In 2014 everis joined NTT DATA Group, the sixth-largest IT services company in the world with 100,000 professionals and with offices in Asia-Pacific, the Middle East, Europe, Latin America and North America.

Above all, everis believes in its people, their ongoing development and their talent. We are firmly committed to talent and our main goal is to nurture high performing professionals by creating an environment of responsible freedom.

Meet Catalonia Trade & Investment

Catalonia Trade & Investment is the Catalan Government agency for foreign investment and business competitiveness. It promotes innovation, internationalisation, trade and funding of Catalan companies and startups. It also organizes trade missions in countries chosen strategically for their business and technology cooperation opportunities.

In addition, it offers specialised one-stop-shop services to international investors and corporations, attracting foreign direct investment to Barcelona and Catalonia. Headquartered in Barcelona, Catalonia Trade & Investment operates from 40 offices around the world, covering over 100 markets.

Meet InnovationQuarter

InnovationQuarter is the economic development agency for West Holland.

InnovationQuarter finances innovative and fast-growing companies, assists international companies in establishing their businesses in West Holland, and facilitates (international) collaboration between innovative entrepreneurs, knowledge institutes and government.

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X-systems opens office at The Hague Security Delta Campus

Many companies are unaware of existing vulnerabilities and cyberthreats in their ICT infrastructure. X-Systems offers companies tools and methods to improve their cybersecurity, ranging from highly customized applications to simple measures that increase resilience. Maximum performance at minimum risks in accordance with the wishes.

Devices are being connected to ICT-networks in growing numbers. Because many of these devices are insufficiently secured at their core, they cause vulnerabilities to cyber attacks, criminals and spies in entire ICT networks. Cyber criminals can enter most organizations within a few days, by simply spoofing (duplicating) the WIFI network and gain access to all company and personal data without the company noticing the attack.

Launch of XECURE.ME platform

At the Mobile World Congress, X-Systems celebrated the launch of its platform XECURE.ME, where organizations are introduced to IoT security architects. John Meyers, CTO at X-SYSTEMS: “XECURE.ME users have a secure ICT architecture, preventing cyberattacks. This is essential, since the cost of undoing a cyber attack ranges from several hundred thousands to millions of euro’s, not to mention system failures, fines and reputation damage”.

Chris van Voorden, head of Foreign Investments at InnovationQuarter:

”We are very pleased to welcome X-Systems at The Hague Security Delta. With ongoing digitalization, and everything becoming mobile and interconnected, infrastructures are becoming more and more dependent on Internet of Things. Security is a very important aspect, which X-Systems helps companies to tackle. Because of this, we believe X-Systems will contribute to our ecosystem and a safer future.”

The Hague is renowned for its international position as the City of Peace, Justice & Security. It provides X-Systems with a prosperous business environment near its main customers. Furthermore, X-Systems’ membership with The Hague Security Delta (HSD) positions it at the centre of Europe’s leading security cluster. HSD is a community of companies, government organisations and knowledge institutes, who serve as a new market for foreign companies and as a platform to create new (innovative) initiatives. Home to this cluster is the HSD Campus: the innovation centre for the security industry, with living labs, training facilities, flexible office space and meeting rooms.

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There are high expectations of the quantum computer: it should enable us to perform calculations that we cannot do with current technology. “I am thinking of intricate global climate change models, for example, or models of the immune system’s capability to destroy cancer cells”, said Rector Magnificus Tim van der Hagen during the opening. “We can also use quantum technology to make inherently secure internet connections.”

Joint effort

Delivering on these promises will require major investments in money, time and effort in the coming years. “The development of the quantum computer requires a joint effort from science, government and industry”, says Ronald Hanson, scientific director of QuTech. “We are very pleased with the support we receive from the Dutch government, but even more cooperation – at national and international level – is certainly needed in the coming years.”

Cooperation with industry is essential in this respect, which is why TU Delft and TNO are pleased with the arrival of the Microsoft Quantum Lab on campus. “In Delft, we are building an innovation ecosystem around quantum technology, a Quantum Campus, where all parties will join forces to realise the quantum computer and the quantum internet”, says Hanson.

Building blocks

The Microsoft Quantum Lab will be working on qubits – the building blocks of quantum computers – based on majorana particles. This will be done under the leadership of Leo Kouwenhoven, who found the first evidence of the elusive majorana particle in 2012 at TU Delft. Majorana-based qubits are one of the three roadmaps QuTech is working on. Hanson: “Majorana particles are a potential candidate for qubits, and in this area we are collaborating closely with Microsoft. We are also working with other partners on other options for making qubits, for example with nitrogen atoms in diamond or with currents in superconducting circuits. The interaction between the different groups, and the exchange of knowledge between the various roadmaps make Delft an important place for quantum research. This position has been strengthened further with the establishment of the Microsoft lab.”

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Minister Wiebes of Economic Affairs & Climate Policy: “These results once again confirm that foreign companies are important to our globally operating country. Around one million people work for foreign companies in the Netherlands and an additional half-million work indirectly for these companies as suppliers, particularly in SMEs. Due to the growing international uncertainty surrounding Brexit and changing global trade policies, the importance of a good Dutch business climate for all of us is continually increasing.”

The work of the NFIA falls partly under the responsibility of the Minister for Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation, Sigrid Kaag: “The impending Brexit and tensions around international trade provide opportunities for Dutch companies. Our companies are innovative, flexible and adapt to this changing market. Furthermore, the Netherlands’ position as a stable economic hub is also attractive to foreign companies. This position will only be further strengthened. It is positive that this is reflected in the approximately 10,000 newly-created jobs in 2018.”

These results once again confirm that foreign companies are important to our globally operating country – Minister Wiebes of Economic Affairs & Climate Policy

From headquarters to R&D

The NFIA is responsible for 8,475 out of the 9,847 jobs created by the Invest in Holland network. In 2018, the NFIA managed to attract 248 foreign investment projects to the Netherlands, which collectively account for 2.76 billion euros in investments. The annual results also show that the majority of new jobs are created within headquarters (2,259), followed by marketing & sales offices (1,834), distribution centers (1,053), service centers (977), production sites (884) and R&D locations (755). As illustration, sports media company DAZN established a development center in Amsterdam, Giant and Timberland expanded their European distribution locations (in Lelystad and Almelo respectively) and Mitsui Chemicals committed to producing plastics at the Chemelot Campus in Limburg.

The majority of ‘foreign jobs’ are, as in 2017, created by US companies. In 2018, this accounted for 3,185 jobs, with a total accompanying investment of 1.19 billion euros. Following the US is the United Kingdom (1,596 jobs), then China (614 jobs), Japan (580 jobs) and Germany (300 jobs).

More Brexit companies

In 2018, the Invest in Holland network brought 42 companies to the Netherlands as a result of Brexit, accounting for 1,923 jobs and some 291 million euros in investments. Companies signaling expansion of their offices in the Netherlands partly due to Brexit , include the Japanese investment bank Norinchukin and media company TVT Media. Financial services providers MarketAxess and Azimo, and maritime insurer UK P&I all announced office openings in our country last year,  due to  Brexit as well. The relocation of the European Medicines Agency(EMA) to Amsterdam, also supported by Invest in Holland, is included herein. In 2019, several companies, including Discovery and Bloomberg, have already announced their intention to invest in the Netherlands because of Brexit.

The number of companies relocating activities to our country due to Brexit has grown compared to 2017, during which 18 companies made a Brexit-related move to the Netherlands. Additionally, the NFIA is talking with more than 250 foreign companies considering setting up operations in the Netherlands following Brexit. These are predominantly British companies, but also American and Asian organizations that are reconsidering their current European structure due to uncertainties caused by Brexit. These include companies in the financial sector, media and advertising, life sciences & health and logistics. In addition to the Netherlands, these companies are also investigating options in other countries, including Germany, France and Ireland.

Since the establishment of the Invest in Holland network in 2015, the NFIA and its regional partners have attracted 1,402 companies to the Netherlands. This has resulted in a total direct inward investment of 8.1 billion euros and the creation of more than 43,000 jobs in the Netherlands. In addition to the NFIA, the Invest in Holland network comprises the regional development agencies: NOM, Oost NL, North-Holland North, amsterdam inbusiness, InnovationQuarter, The Hague Business Agency, Rotterdam Partners, Invest Utrecht, BOM, Invest in Zeeland, LIOF and HIDC.

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The bio-based solutions created in Leiden will have a direct impact on some of the most pressing societal issues of today: reducing food waste; reducing the environmental impacts of livestock farming and improving animal health; producing renewable fuels; and lowering environmental impacts in the textile and laundry industries.
The capacity of the new site in Oegstgeest will double the potential for growth of the current employee base, with the potential of creating an additional 100 jobs at the facility, including research and development, application development, marketing, sales and customer service. The building will serve as the new EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa) headquarters for DuPont Industrial Biosciences.

“Our Leiden scientists have been developing innovations that enable our customers to improve the efficiency and sustainability of their processes and products for many years,” said Simon Herriott, Vice President & Global Business Director for Bioactives at DuPont. “This new facility will enable our teams to do even more – to improve the pace of biotechnology and the speed with which we can deliver it to market. The ecosystem of talent, academia and community we find in the Leiden Bio Science Park is ideal for our work and for keeping us globally competitive.”
“Oegstgeest is pleased with DuPont establishing a site in our municipality. With DuPont building this facility in the Oegstgeest part of the Leiden Bio Science Park, organizations such as Corpus, Hilton and Avery Denison will be joined by an esteemed neighbor,” commented Jan Nieuwenhuis, Alderman Economic Development and Bio Science Park of the Executive Mayor and Aldermen of the city of Oegstgeest. “We are pleased to welcome such an internationally oriented, science-driven and socially responsible company as DuPont into the region, which undoubtedly will impact local job development.”

DuPont has partnered with Dutch developer and construction company Dura Vermeer on the building in Oegstgeest, which will cover 7250 square meters, a doubling of the capacity of the current facility for the business. The project will receive a BREEAM “Excellent” rating – an impressive measure of a building’s sustainability and environmental footprint. The construction is scheduled to be completed in 2020.

“The design is in the service of the employees,” said Director Peter Krop of Dura Vermeer. “Ultimately, it is about creating the right inspiring and flexible working environment. We are proud to be able to add DuPont to our customer list.”

The construction marks an important milestone in the growth of the company, with the new site in Oegstgeest being an important hub for business in Europe, Middle East and Africa.

Source: DuPont Industrial Biosciences

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Brazilian company DEX sets up office in The Hague

During the event, The Brazilian company DEX (Driving Educational eXcellence), the first company to use the services of ‘Softlanding The Hague’, was also presented. DEX chose to set up their business at The Hague Tech Campus. DEX will conduct research and development for the Brazilian company Inteligência Relacional, market leader in emotional and social intelligence educational programs with a client portfolio of nearly 1 million students. Inteligencia Relacional was established in The Hague this year as well.

About “Softlanding The Hague”

The ‘Softlanding The Hague’-program is founded by The Hague TechThe Hague Business Agency, InnovationQuarter & WorldStartupFactory . It is a full-service soft-landing program offering startups a one-stop-shop for business expansion and soft-landing related services. It is setup for international Tech startups and scale-ups who are interested to get a taste of the Dutch market, who want to validate their product-market fit, have interest in meeting potential customers and partners and want to join an active Tech community in The Hague. The program is free of charge, tailor-made and open for startups and scale-ups in all phases.

Interested in joining?

Find more information, or register directly here or get in touch with Stef Prinsen.

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F.L.T.R. Chris van Voorden, Director Foreign Investments InnovationQuarter, Chris Heunis, Managing Director CampusKey Europe, Paul Dirkse, Deputy Mayor of Leiden, Leon Howell, Managing Director CampusKey SA, Neno Haasbroek, Co-Founder CampusKey, Niels Krol, Account Manager InnovationQuarter, Antoin van Rensburg, Co-Founder CampusKey (Foto © Daniel Verkijk)

Expanding to Europe

Since the start of CampusKey in 2012, they have successfully developed student housing facilities in six university cities and currently house 3749 students. Their main focus will be on international students and the concept therefore includes a couple of distinctive features that sets this formula apart from others.

There is a strong focus on safety and security within the building, using finger recognition technology to enter the premises and rooms. They also offer 24-hour counselling and mentoring services to students who are in immediate need for help or guidance, far away from family and friends. The main purpose of CampusKey is to create ‘a home away from home’, which means activities for residents are organized on a weekly base, so students can meet up, interact and make new friends.

Leiden is not only relevant as a student city, but it also has quick access to Schiphol Airport, with the rest of Europe in easy reach.- Chris Heunis, Managing Director of CampusKey Europe

CampusKey was assisted in setting up the Dutch operations in Leiden by the Netherlands Foreign Investment Agency, InnovationQuarter and the City of Leiden.

Team CampusKey: Chris Heunis, Leon Howell, Neno Haasbroek and Antoin van Rensburg (Foto © Daniel Verkijk)

CampusKey Co-Founder Neno Haasbroek: “As the South African market is now well served by our concept, we decided last year that it would be interesting to look into expanding to the European market. Our preliminary research was very promising and we believe there is a lot of potential in Europe, especially when you look at the tremendous increase of foreign students coming to Europe.”

Deputy Mayor of Leiden, Paul Dirkse is happy and proud that yet another South African company has chosen Leiden for the location of their European headquarters: “Being the oldest university city in The Netherlands and one of the oldest in Europe, I can fully understand their decision to locate to Leiden! I’m sure the expertise CampusKey has built up over the years in South Africa in creating ‘a home away from home’ will be of added value for students and student cities throughout Europe.”

Besides historical ties and a similar language, The Netherlands was especially chosen for its comparable business mentality, which is, like in South Africa, also based on cooperation, openness and straightforwardness, says Chris Heunis, Managing Director of CampusKey Europe: “Leiden is not only relevant as a student city, but it also has quick access to Schiphol Airport, with the rest of Europe in easy reach”.

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Challenging

ArianeGroup, which has the design authority and industrial lead for the Ariane 6 launcher development and operation on behalf of the European Space Agency (ESA), appointed Airbus Netherlands partner for the development and production of the Ariane 6 Vulcain Aft Bay (VUAB) and the Vinci Thrust Frame (VITF) in June 2017. It led to the decision to build a dedicated industry 4.0 facility for the development and production of the Ariane 6 and also Vega-C structures. “Within 10 months, our state-of-the-art assembly facility has been built and equipped with innovative solutions, like a robotised production line and visualisation tools,” says Arnaud de Jong, managing director of Airbus Netherlands, “The smart factory is now fully ready to fulfil its challenging task and today’s opening is the crowning glory of a huge team effort. An effort which illustrates the clear mind-set to produce the new Ariane 6 engine frames in the most cost- and time-efficient way.”

InnovationQuarter has been involved in the process of finding a suitable location for the new Airbus production facility. “We are most happy with the expansion of Airbus,” says Niels Krol, senior accountmanager (Aero)space at InnovationQuarter. “It means a significant reinforcement for the space cluster in our region.”

Optimise logistics and assembly

To address the challenging commercial set-up of the European Ariane 6 programme, the Dutch space company Airbus chose a development and industrialisation approach that strikes a balance between heritage and the needed innovative green fields approach. This led to two key decisions to optimise the logistics and the assembly line:

  • The new site has a direct connection to the Rotterdam sea port, enabling safe and rapid transport of the large VUAB structure (5.4m diameter, 5.2m high) to ArianeGroup in Les Mureaux, France, for final assembly with the Ariane 6 launcher. The VITF engine frame will be transported to Bremen by road. Final stop for both engine frames is the European launch site Kourou in French Guyana.
  • The extended enterprise philosophy used by ArianeGroup towards its first tier partners was translated by Airbus Netherlands to its own supply chain. To gain maximum benefit, the main suppliers (and their machining facilities) are being integrated in the dedicated Ariane 6 facility, working as a shop-in-shop.

Industry 4.0

The facility is equipped with ‘Industry 4.0’ robotisation and automation capabilities, in order to be prepared for the anticipated production rates up to 24 engine frames (12 VUAB’s and 12 VITF’s) per year. Key elements of the industrialisation approach are:

  • Decision to have engineering and production go hand-in-hand;
  • Handling and assembly jig & tool concept based on a “flow process” instead of rigid and fixed-placed elements;
  • Implementation of smart manufacturing principles, including factory automation, implementation of a paperless factory and the application of lean flow principles.

 

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Johnson & Johnson Unveils New Vaccines Launch Facility in Holland

Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson officially opened its state-of-the-art vaccines launch facility in Leiden, the Netherlands. The new facility represents a significant investment by the company in novel vaccines development, global health and security, and pandemic preparedness efforts. In addition, the facility features innovative technological and manufacturing platforms to support the large-scale production of vaccines for clinical trials and global launch.

Janssen’s launch facility is the latest example of the company’s leadership in pharmaceutical R&D in the Netherlands. The company will utilize a number of cutting-edge research and development (R&D) platforms at the vaccines launch facility, including Janssen’s proprietary AdVac® viral vector vaccines technology and the company’s PER.C6® manufacturing platform.

“This new center represents a significant commitment by Johnson & Johnson in our mission to change the trajectory of human health,” said Johan Van Hoof, M.D., Global Therapeutic Area Head IDV, Vaccines, Janssen Pharmaceuticals R&D and Managing Director, Janssen Vaccines & Prevention B.V.

By investing locally, we hope to protect globally by ensuring that innovative and effective vaccines become available to the people that need them wherever they may live.

Europe’s Leading Hub for R&D Innovation

The Netherlands’ world-class research institutes, supportive R&D tax credits and strategic partnerships between science, industry and government, make it a renowned hub for R&D. Furthermore, Holland is home to R&D operations of major companies like Philips, IBM and MSD. Janssen will utilize Holland’s unmatched technology infrastructure, multilingual workforce and innovative ecosystem to improve global health and create new vaccines.

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Scheltema’s warm industrial look of dark-brown wood and faded steel gave the atmosphere at LINQ an informal and friendly character. Attending entrepreneurs were paired into smaller groups with other entrepreneurs, so that getting in touch with peers and potential partners was easier. The groups then received demonstrations of eight of West Holland’s cutting-edge technologies on the innovation floor:

  • TWNKLS, a known name even in Silicon circles, presented the world’s most successful non-game augmented reality app. With a toy car they demonstrated how their technology helps Lamborgini mechanics to decompose the different internal parts of the car in order to better repair possible defects. And how their app helps IKEA customer to see how the chair they want to buy fits into their home before buying.
  • MomoMedical demonstrated their new hospital bed with smart sensors that registers how long people have laid in the same position and whether they have to be turned over.
  • On the innovation floor was also Qlayer’s disruptive coating technique with their autonomous painting robot creating microstructured coatings in a locally protected environment.
  • Then there was Tessa, a robot by Tinybots. Tessa helps people with difficulties concerning structure and routine tasks (for instance people with dementia) by structuring their day.
  • Berry Sanders from Fleet Space Technologies explained how their plug and play satellite system allows people to receive sensor data from any location in the world.
  • Sybren de Jong demonstrated Tropomi to the international business community. Tropomi is a Dutch climate and air pollution measuring satellite, co-developed by Airbus.
  • LeydenJar Technologies demonstrated their 100% silicon anode rolls that boost the energy density of Li-ion battery cells with up to 50% (1.200 Wh/l).

Let’s LINQ

InnovationQuarter’s mission is to strengthen the regional economy in West Holland by supporting and stimulating the innovation potential of this unique delta region. In close co-operation with all major corporations, educational and research institutions, and government organizations, we assist and support foreign companies like yours with their establishment, business expansion and relocation plans in our region.

And of course, we maintain in close contact with the 2,200 international companies that are already established here. Looking for collaborative contacts or in need of assistance? Get in touch with our team and we’ll introduce you in our extensive network.

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Delft hosted General Assembly of European aerospace cluster partnership

This was a perfect opportunity to show 37 aerospace organizations from 14 different countries the unique ecosystems in Delft and the West Holland region. The EACP exchanges information and knowledge between its partners and develops long-term transnational cooperation between clusters and companies. Lots of possibilities for cooperation between West Holland and other European regions were discussed on topics like earth observation (Lazio), UAV’s (Puglia) and cabin design (Hamburg).

10 reasons why West Holland is the hotspot for Aerospace

The spectacular atrium of Westcord hotel Delft was the central venue for the GA meeting. After a day of presentations and working groups, the members enjoyed a canal tour through the city centre. Special guest at the dinner in Wijnhaven was alderman Bas Vollebregt who welcomed the guests and elaborated on the strong aerospace footprint of the city.

The following day the participants visited TU Delft incubator YES!Delft and spoke to some aeronautic start-ups and scale-ups. In the afternoon they took a look at the World Horti Centre to learn about the mutual challenges both the aerospace and the horticulture industry face like robotization, sustainability, and use of new/durable energy.